NEW Flood Risk Data Available

New Flood Data Adds an Extra Dimension for Shoppers and for Research

September 1st, 2020 – Now, flood data, available on realtor.com® will enable buyers to consider the flood risk of a location when thinking about their home purchase.  The flood data includes an estimate of a home’s FEMA flood zone as well as Flood FactorTM, comprehensive flood risk data displayed at the property level in the form of a score, ranging from 1 (minimal risk) to 10 (extreme risk) powered by the First Street Foundation. When available for a property, it will display the current risk of flooding for the home; whether that risk is increasing, decreasing, or constant; and the likelihood of that property experiencing a flood event over the next 30 years. 

Previous research conducted by realtor.com® and featured in the Wall Street Journal found evidence that homes outside of FEMA high-risk flood zones appreciated faster than homes inside those zones between 2012 and 2017, suggesting that buyers already attempt to adjust for this risk. But most buyers are not deterred just because a home has flood risk.  In a consumer survey conducted this spring by Toluna research for realtor.com®, a majority of buyers (55 percent) would still buy a home even if they knew it was in a flood zone, but roughly four in 10 buyers would expect some kind of discount on the home, presumably for the extra costs associated with flood risk. Younger shoppers were more open to buying a home with flood risk than those aged 55 and older.

The shopping experience on realtor.com® will now make information about flood risk available to home buyers, homeowners, and real estate agents upfront. It will enable buyers to factor this risk into their evaluation of the tradeoffs of buying a particular home. The data will also help buyers and owners ensure they have adequate insurance coverage, since flood risks are not covered by homeowner’s insurance policies. By helping real estate agents make this risk an early part of the home search discussion, this data may incentivize owners to make improvements to their homes that help mitigate flood risk. This information may also reduce the likelihood that a home sale is derailed by unexpected information about flood risks late into the transaction.

In the future, this flood risk data will enable research to answer questions such as how a rating affects the price of a home or how long it takes to sell. We may also be able to evaluate whether the FEMA mapping or Flood FactorTM data have different impacts on market outcomes or consumer home shopping behavior.

For assistance in finding the right home or guidance in the real estate market, Talk To Tammy636.931.9100!

COVID-19: The Effect On Rental Markets

August, 2020 – Pricey Cities Become Cheaper, Cheaper Cities Become Costly

While the rental market remains far from robust, two important factors — rent decreases in the country’s most expensive cities and rent increases in more affordable cities — suggest the coronavirus pandemic is causing a squeezing effect on rental prices across the country.

According to online rental platform Zumper, this seesaw effect has continued to accelerate this summer as the outbreak persists and more Americans are opting for cheaper places to live while working remotely.

“In our August national rent report, seven of the 10 priciest markets had larger year-over-year percentage decreases than the month prior,” said Anthemos Georgiades, co-founder and CEO of Zumper. “Additionally, five of these cities had larger month-over-month percent decreases this month than last. Meanwhile, of the top 10 least expensive cities in this report, only one city experienced a decrease in rent.”

The two priciest markets continued their downward trajectories with San Francisco and New York City one-bedroom rents down 11% and 7%, respectively, since this time last year.Of the top 10 least expensive cities in the 100 tracked in the report, only one city, Tulsa, Oklahoma, had a decrease in median rent for one-bedrooms.

“As historically expensive cities become cheaper and historically cheaper cities become more expensive, the gap between the price distribution of rentals across the country seems to be closing,” said Georgiades. Overall, the national one-bedroom rent increased 0.3% to a median of $1,233, while two-bedrooms grew 0.6% to $1,493. On a year-to-date basis, one and two-bedroom prices are up 0.7% and 1%, respectively.

Here are the top five rental markets:

1. In San Francisco, one-bedroom rent dropped another 2.4% last month to $3,200, while two-bedrooms decreased 3% to $4,210. Notably, both one and two-bedroom rents are now down over 11% since this time last year.

2. New York City, similar to San Francisco, continued to see rents drop with one-bedrooms declining 1.7% to $2,840 and two-bedrooms decreasing 0.3% to $3,200. Both one and two-bedroom prices in this city have fallen around 7% year-over-year.

3. Boston saw one-bedroom rent drop 2.5% to $2,350, while two-bedrooms dipped 3.1% to $2,810.

4. San Jose, California held on as the fourth priciest market with one-bedroom rent remaining flat at $2,300, while two-bedrooms decreased 1.4% to $2,820.

5. Oakland, California moved down one spot to become the fifth most expensive market with one-bedroom rent falling 3.5% to $2,220, while two-bedrooms grew 1.8% to $2,900.

In stark contrast to the nation’s most expensive cities, median rents in less expensive cities have been steadily increasing. Tulsa, Oklahoma, inched up one position to become the 99th priciest market with one-bedroom rent growing 5.1% to $620 and two-bedrooms increasing 1.2% to $820.

Memphis catapulted up eight spots to rank as 76th. One-bedroom rent jumped 5.1% to $820, while two-bedroom units climbed 4.8% to $880.

Durham, North Carolina moved up nine positions to 43rd with one-bedroom rent growing 4.8% to $1,090. Two-bedroom rent had a more modest growth rate, increasing 1.6% to $1,250.

Providence, Rhode Island moved down four spots to rank as the 22nd priciest city and tied with Washington, D.C. for the largest rental decline last month, falling 4.8% to $1,400.

Washington, D.C. remained the sixth priciest market and similar to Providence, Rhode Island, saw rent drop 4.8%, settling at $2,160, while two-bedrooms decreased 1.4% to $2,880.

Nationally, median rents continue to tick up during the summer moving season. Overall, the national one-bedroom rent increased 0.3% to a median of $1,233, while two-bedrooms grew 0.6% to $1,493. On a year-to-date basis, one and two-bedroom prices are up 0.7% and 1%, respectively.

If you are ready to invest in a rental property, looking for the right home or need guidance in selling your house, Talk To Tammy636.931.9100

Existing-Home Sales Climb RECORD 20.7%

June 2020, Existing-home sales rebounded at a record pace in June, showing strong signs of a market turnaround after three straight months of sales declines caused by the ongoing pandemic, according to the National Association of Realtors®. Each of the four major regions achieved month-over-month growth, with the West experiencing the greatest sales recovery.

Total existing-home sales,1 https://www.nar.realtor/existing-home-sales, completed transactions that include single-family homes, townhomes, condominiums and co-ops, jumped 20.7% from May to a seasonally-adjusted annual rate of 4.72 million in June. Sales overall, however, dipped year-over-year, down 11.3% from a year ago (5.32 million in June 2019).

“The sales recovery is strong, as buyers were eager to purchase homes and properties that they had been eyeing during the shutdown,” said Lawrence Yun, NAR’s chief economist. “This revitalization looks to be sustainable for many months ahead as long as mortgage rates remain low and job gains continue.”

The median existing-home price for all housing types in June was $295,300, up 3.5% from June 2019 ($285,400), as prices rose in every region. June’s national price increase marks 100 straight months of year-over-year gains.

Total housing inventory3 at the end of June totaled 1.57 million units, up 1.3% from May, but still down 18.2% from one year ago (1.92 million). Unsold inventory sits at a 4.0-month supply at the current sales pace, down from both 4.8 months in May and from the 4.3-month figure recorded in June 2019.

Yun explains that significantly low inventory was a problem even before the pandemic and says such circumstances can lead to inflated costs.

“Home prices rose during the lockdown and could rise even further due to heavy buyer competition and a significant shortage of supply.”

Yun’s concerns are underscored in NAR’s recently released 2020 Member Profile, in which Realtors® point to low inventory as being one of the top hindrances for potential buyers.

Properties typically remained on the market for 24 days in June, seasonally down from 26 days in May, and down from 27 days in June 2019. Sixty-two percent of homes sold in June 2020 were on the market for less than a month.

First-time buyers were responsible for 35% of sales in June, up from 34% in May 2020 and about equal to 35% in June 2019. NAR’s 2019 Profile of Home Buyers and Sellers – released in late 20194 – revealed that the annual share of first-time buyers was 33%.

Individual investors or second-home buyers, who account for many cash sales, purchased 9% of homes in June, down from 14% in May 2020 and 10% in June 2019. All-cash sales accounted for 16% of transactions in June, down from 17% in May 2020 and about equal to 16% in June 2019.

Distressed sales5 – foreclosures and short sales – represented 3% of sales in June, about even with May but up from 2% in June 2019.

“It’s inspiring to see Realtors® absorb the shock and unprecedented challenges of the virus-induced shutdowns and bounce back in this manner,” said NAR President Vince Malta, broker at Malta & Co., Inc., in San Francisco, Calif. “NAR and our 1.4 million members will continue to tirelessly work to facilitate our nation’s economic recovery as we all adjust to this new normal.”

According to Freddie Mac, the average commitment rate(link is external) for a 30-year, conventional, fixed-rate mortgage decreased to 3.16% in June, down from 3.23% in May. The average commitment rate across all of 2019 was 3.94%.

Single-family and Condo/Co-op Sales

Single-family home sales sat at a seasonally-adjusted annual rate of 4.28 million in June, up 19.9% from 3.57 million in May, and down 9.9% from one year ago. The median existing single-family home price was $298,600 in June, up 3.5% from June 2019.

Existing condominium and co-op sales were recorded at a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 440,000 units in June, up 29.4% from May and down 22.8% from a year ago. The median existing condo price was $262,700 in June, an increase of 1.4% from a year ago.

“Homebuyers considering a move to the suburbs is a growing possibility after a decade of urban downtown revival,” Yun said. “Greater work-from-home options and flexibility will likely remain beyond the virus and any forthcoming vaccine.”

Regional Breakdown

In a complete reversal of the month prior, sales for June increased in every region. Median home prices grew in each of the four major regions from one year ago.

June 2020 existing-home sales in the Northeast rose 4.3%, recording an annual rate of 490,000, a 27.9% decrease from a year ago. The median price in the Northeast was $332,900, up 3.6% from June 2019.

Existing-home sales increased 11.1% in the Midwest to an annual rate of 1,100,000 in June, down 13.4% from a year ago. The median price in the Midwest was $236,900, a 3.2% increase from June 2019.

Existing-home sales in the South jumped 26.0% to an annual rate of 2.18 million in June, down 4.0% from the same time one year ago. The median price in the South was $258,500, a 4.4% increase from a year ago.

Existing-home sales in the West ascended 31.9% to an annual rate of 950,000 in June, a 13.6% decline from a year ago. The median price in the West was $432,600, up 5.4% from June 2019.

The National Association of Realtors® is America’s largest trade association, representing more than 1.4 million members involved in all aspects of the residential and commercial real estate industries. Talk To Tammy, and see what the best options are for you with selling your house or finding the right home. 636-931-9100, Tammy Fadler

Commercial Real Estate Investments In Recessionary Times

The longest bull market in history came to an end in March 2020. A pandemic-driven economic shutdown plunged us into a recession. And while we all know what a recession means for the stock market, one has to wonder what it means for commercial real estate.

To better understand the performance of commercial real estate, let’s look to the past. Over the last 40 years, there have been five distinct recessions. CBRE evaluated the performance of multifamily, industrial and office real estate during the last two of those recessions (2001 and 2008-09).

2001 Recession

During the 2001 recession, CBRE found that multifamily outperformed office and industrial real estate. Any negative growth trends seen during the recession were more prolonged in industrial and office while minimized in multifamily.

Additionally, the post-recession recovery was far more robust for multifamily than it was for those other two commercial real estate asset classes.

2008-2009 Recession

When CBRE looked at the Great Recession, it found the exact same picture: Not only did multifamily outperform industrial and office real estate; it also surpassed retail real estate.

Whether you look at negative growth trends, return to prior peak or growth past prior peak, it’s not even close. Commercial multifamily real estate far outperformed the other commercial real estate asset classes.

The superior performance of multifamily in the last two recessions is interesting, but let’s go back further and see how it performed in older recessions.

NCREIF Property Index

The National Council of Real Estate Investment Fiduciaries (NCREIF) has been tracking the performance of commercial real estate since the fourth quarter of 1977. The NCREIF Property Index (NPI) is a composite index that reflects quarterly property returns for apartment, hotel, industrial, office and retail real estate. It’s the most commonly quoted performance measure for institutionally held private real estate.

In 1998, a research paper entitled “Twenty Years Of The NCREIF Property Index” (download required) was published. That study looked at the performance history of NPI from 1978 to 1997. This time period encompasses the other three recessions that occurred over the last 40 years.

What it found was that during that 20-year period, multifamily real estate outperformed the other commercial real estate asset classes. In fact, it was the only commercial real estate asset class to average a double-digit annual return over that period.

Not only did the research show that multifamily had the best overall annual return; it also had the best risk-adjusted return (Sharpe ratio) with a low standard deviation.

Multifamily Real Estate

Certainly, there have been years in which other commercial real estate asset classes have outperformed multifamily. However, over the long haul, apartments have consistently been the top performer.

In February 2018, the National Multifamily Housing Council (NMHC) authored a study titled “Explaining The Puzzle of High Apartment Returns.” It compared the performance history of apartment, industrial, retail and office real estate from 1987 to 2016.

What it found, yet again, was that over all long-term holding periods (three, five, seven, 10 or 15 years), apartments had the highest returns, best Sharpe ratio and lowest standard deviation. In other words, apartments consistently outperformed the other commercial real estate asset classes.

Covid-19 And Commercial Real Estate

Multifamily’s superior performance history both in good times and in bad is well established. However, the global pandemic caused by Covid-19 is far from your average recession. And while the history books are yet to be written about its economic effects, we do have the first 90 days that we can evaluate.

Take, for example, rent collections for apartments. NMHC publishes a monthly rent tracker. While many expected a large number of renters to forgo their rental payment obligations, it simply hasn’t materialized. Data from over 11 million apartment units shows that 94.6% and 95.1% of renters made their monthly payments in April and May, respectively. That is only minimally down from the same time period in 2019 (97.7% in April and 96.6% in May).

In contrast, consider the year-over-year declines for hotels (paywall). Statista reports that the week ending May 30, 2020, saw an average occupancy rate of 36.6%, an average daily rate of $82.94, and revenue per available room (RevPAR) of $30.34. That’s a year-over-year decline of 43.2%, 33.3%, and 62.1%, respectively.

In fact, as of May 2020, more than a third of hotel CMBS loans and a quarter of retail CMBS loans are currently on servicer watchlists due to distress.

Conclusion

Time and time again, commercial multifamily real estate has proved its mettle as a top-performing asset class. A big part of its recession-resistant nature lies in the resilience of housing and the basic need for shelter.

This insulates apartments to a large degree from the ups and downs of the market cycles. With the low correlation to the market, strong performance history and recession-resistant nature of apartments, it’s not surprising that many people see commercial multifamily real estate as an essential component of their portfolios.  Be sure to use a Realtor with knowledge of the area and who can give you good advice based on knowledge and experience.

If you have any questions about the real estate market, investment opportunities and if you want to sell your house or need help finding the right home for you – Talk To Tammy, 636.931.9100 !

Key Housing Indicators Begin to Turn Around in May

  • National inventory declined by 19.9 percent year-over-year, and inventory in large markets decreased by 21.9 percent.
  • The inventory of newly listed properties declined by 29.4 percent over the past year, and 28.6 percent in large markets
  • The May national median listing price was $330,000, up 1.6 percent year-over-year.
  • Nationally, homes sold in 71 days in May, 15 days more slowly than last year

Realtor.com®’s May housing data release reveals that the U.S. housing market likely reached its low point during mid-April, with constrained new listings and minimal price growth. Signs of recovery emerged, as yearly declines in newly listed inventory slowed and listing prices recovered. However, despite many positive trends, COVID-related challenges linger, as homes were on the market more than two weeks longer than this time last year. 

For-Sale Homes Still in Short Supply, but New Listings Trend Improves

The total number of homes available for sale continued to be constrained in May. Nationally, inventory decreased 19.9 percent year-over-year, a faster rate of decline compared to the 15.3 percent year-over-year drop in April. This amounted to a loss of 255,000 listings compared to May of last year. The volume of newly listed properties in May decreased by 29.4 percent since last year. While still well below last year’s levels, the rate of decline in newly listed properties has improved from a decline of 44.1 percent year-over-year in April, signaling that sellers are starting to return to the marketplace, which is needed to restore inventory levels to healthy market conditions 

Housing inventory in the 50 largest U.S. metros declined by 21.9 percent year-over-year in May. This is an acceleration compared to the 16.0 percent year-over-year decline in April. The metros which saw the biggest declines in inventory were typically those hardest hit by COVID-19, such as Philadelphia-Camden-Wilmington, PA-NJ-DE-MD (-38.6 percent); Providence-Warwick, RI-MA (-35.8%); and Baltimore-Columbia-Towson, MD (-34.5%). This month, none of the largest 50 metros saw an inventory increase on a year-over-year basis and 43 out of 50 saw greater inventory declines than last month. However, 45 out of the 50 markets saw the yearly decline in newly listed properties improve somewhat since last month.

COVID-19 Extends Days on Market

Homes continue to sell more slowly than last year due to stay at home orders and modified behavior resulting from COVID-19. Nationally, the typical home sold in 71 days in May, 15 days more slowly than May of last year. In the 50 largest U.S. metros, the typical home spent 58 days on the market, and homes sold 13 days more slowly, on average, compared to last May. Last month, the increase in time spent on market was more apparent in the 50 largest metros. This month, it appears that the nation’s largest metros have improved relative to the national rate. Among the larger metropolitan areas, homes saw the greatest increase in time spent on the market in Buffalo-Cheektowaga-Niagara Falls, NY (+34 days); Pittsburgh, PA (+33 days); and Detroit-Warren-Dearborn-MI (+32 days); among other areas that have been particularly hard-hit by COVID-19.

Listing Prices Hit New Highs Despite COVID-19

The median national home listing price grew by 1.6 percent year-over-year, to a new high of $330,000 in May. This is a re-acceleration from the 0.6 percent year-over-year growth seen in April. Movements in the median listing price continue to be partly driven by a change in the mix of inventory. This month, the share of more expensive properties on the market recovered and increased compared to last month. Moreover, our weekly data shows the year-over-year change in the median listing price growing by as much as 3.1 percent year-over-year in the week ending May 30th. The nation’s median listing price per square foot grew by 5.4 percent year-over-year, an acceleration from the 4.0 percent growth seen last month.  

Within the nation’s largest metros, median listing price growth also accelerated compared to last month. Listing prices in the largest metros grew by an average of 3.3 percent last year, an acceleration from the 1.6 percent year-over-year gain seen last month. Of the largest 50 metros, now 35 saw year-over-year gains in median listing prices, up from 30 last month. Los Angeles-Long Beach-Anaheim, CA (+14.9%), Pittsburgh, PA (+14.0 percent); and Cincinnati, OH-KY-IN (+12.1%); posted the highest year-over-year median list price growth in May. The steepest price declines were seen in Detroit-Warren-Dearborn, MI (-3.4 percent); San Antonio-New Braunfels, TX (-3.2 percent); and Seattle-Tacoma-Bellevue, WA (-3.1 percent). 

We can help you list your house with the right price or find you your new home, Talk To Tammy! 636.931.9100