Key Housing Indicators Begin to Turn Around in May

  • National inventory declined by 19.9 percent year-over-year, and inventory in large markets decreased by 21.9 percent.
  • The inventory of newly listed properties declined by 29.4 percent over the past year, and 28.6 percent in large markets
  • The May national median listing price was $330,000, up 1.6 percent year-over-year.
  • Nationally, homes sold in 71 days in May, 15 days more slowly than last year

Realtor.com®’s May housing data release reveals that the U.S. housing market likely reached its low point during mid-April, with constrained new listings and minimal price growth. Signs of recovery emerged, as yearly declines in newly listed inventory slowed and listing prices recovered. However, despite many positive trends, COVID-related challenges linger, as homes were on the market more than two weeks longer than this time last year. 

For-Sale Homes Still in Short Supply, but New Listings Trend Improves

The total number of homes available for sale continued to be constrained in May. Nationally, inventory decreased 19.9 percent year-over-year, a faster rate of decline compared to the 15.3 percent year-over-year drop in April. This amounted to a loss of 255,000 listings compared to May of last year. The volume of newly listed properties in May decreased by 29.4 percent since last year. While still well below last year’s levels, the rate of decline in newly listed properties has improved from a decline of 44.1 percent year-over-year in April, signaling that sellers are starting to return to the marketplace, which is needed to restore inventory levels to healthy market conditions 

Housing inventory in the 50 largest U.S. metros declined by 21.9 percent year-over-year in May. This is an acceleration compared to the 16.0 percent year-over-year decline in April. The metros which saw the biggest declines in inventory were typically those hardest hit by COVID-19, such as Philadelphia-Camden-Wilmington, PA-NJ-DE-MD (-38.6 percent); Providence-Warwick, RI-MA (-35.8%); and Baltimore-Columbia-Towson, MD (-34.5%). This month, none of the largest 50 metros saw an inventory increase on a year-over-year basis and 43 out of 50 saw greater inventory declines than last month. However, 45 out of the 50 markets saw the yearly decline in newly listed properties improve somewhat since last month.

COVID-19 Extends Days on Market

Homes continue to sell more slowly than last year due to stay at home orders and modified behavior resulting from COVID-19. Nationally, the typical home sold in 71 days in May, 15 days more slowly than May of last year. In the 50 largest U.S. metros, the typical home spent 58 days on the market, and homes sold 13 days more slowly, on average, compared to last May. Last month, the increase in time spent on market was more apparent in the 50 largest metros. This month, it appears that the nation’s largest metros have improved relative to the national rate. Among the larger metropolitan areas, homes saw the greatest increase in time spent on the market in Buffalo-Cheektowaga-Niagara Falls, NY (+34 days); Pittsburgh, PA (+33 days); and Detroit-Warren-Dearborn-MI (+32 days); among other areas that have been particularly hard-hit by COVID-19.

Listing Prices Hit New Highs Despite COVID-19

The median national home listing price grew by 1.6 percent year-over-year, to a new high of $330,000 in May. This is a re-acceleration from the 0.6 percent year-over-year growth seen in April. Movements in the median listing price continue to be partly driven by a change in the mix of inventory. This month, the share of more expensive properties on the market recovered and increased compared to last month. Moreover, our weekly data shows the year-over-year change in the median listing price growing by as much as 3.1 percent year-over-year in the week ending May 30th. The nation’s median listing price per square foot grew by 5.4 percent year-over-year, an acceleration from the 4.0 percent growth seen last month.  

Within the nation’s largest metros, median listing price growth also accelerated compared to last month. Listing prices in the largest metros grew by an average of 3.3 percent last year, an acceleration from the 1.6 percent year-over-year gain seen last month. Of the largest 50 metros, now 35 saw year-over-year gains in median listing prices, up from 30 last month. Los Angeles-Long Beach-Anaheim, CA (+14.9%), Pittsburgh, PA (+14.0 percent); and Cincinnati, OH-KY-IN (+12.1%); posted the highest year-over-year median list price growth in May. The steepest price declines were seen in Detroit-Warren-Dearborn, MI (-3.4 percent); San Antonio-New Braunfels, TX (-3.2 percent); and Seattle-Tacoma-Bellevue, WA (-3.1 percent). 

We can help you list your house with the right price or find you your new home, Talk To Tammy! 636.931.9100

Should I Sell My Home During The Coronavirus Pandemic Or Wait?

Jefferson County is considering easing restrictions on its stay-at-home order because of the coronavirus outbreak -businesses in downtown Hillsboro and throughout Jefferson County will be finding out soon about new guidelines for operations when they reopen on May 4th.

In the residential real estate market, we’ve begun to make the changes necessary to have a functioning seller market.  Here are some of the changes that have been made in the Greater St. Louis Metropolitan Area:

  • No more open houses crammed with people
  • Wearing masks and gloves during showings
  • The institution of a new contract rider for coronavirus
  • Title services are now also done as a drive up service.

County Executive Gannon says businesses will be operating under a new normal with some restrictions in place when they reopen. He hopes to have those new guidelines finalized soon. The stay-at-home order ends May 3rd.

Don’t sell your home because of a pandemic –  don’t sell your home because your neighbor is panicking.  Look at all the data you have in front of you and make a decision that you are most comfortable with. 

We are here to help you find the perfect buyer, call: 636-931-9100 !

Will COVID-19 Shift Conditions to a Buyer’s Market or Seller’s Market?

The current market stall in response to COVID-19 presents a unique challenge for market tracking moving forward, and likewise for buyers and sellers trying to understand the housing market that they are walking into. Months’ supply represents the dynamic between listings and sales. As each side of the homebuying transaction responds distinctly to the COVID-19 situation, this dynamic shifts, and “buyer’s market” and “seller’s market” labels along with it.

So, will COVID-19 shift conditions to a buyer’s market, or a seller’s market?

On the one hand, the rate of new listings entering the market has gone down dramatically, adding very little new inventory to the national pool of listings. Likewise, there are fewer closed sales due to social distancing measures. The lack of new listings bottlenecks the potential of sales. If the downturn is roughly equal in listings and sales, then months’ supply as a metric would continue its current trend.

However, as the market resets and picks back up later in the year, listings and sales will likely ramp up at different times, which will have distinct effects on this buyer/seller relationship. As listings reach a critical mass to entice prospective buyers, this accumulation of listings will drive up months’ supply figures, temporarily shifting us to a buyer’s market. Then, as the rate of buyers catches up to listings, this sales and listings dynamic will continue to balance out. Where it ends up at the end of the year, however, remains to be seen.