Archive May 2020

Will Coronavirus Create Multifamily Investment Opportunities?

The past several years have been marked by an increase in average rent prices in many major U.S. cities, a lack of affordable multifamily housing, and a tight rental market. The pandemic and potential recession that may result isn’t likely to lead to more affordable housing, but it could lead to opportunities for some investors ready to cash in on properties in secondary markets.

Here are 3 ways that the multifamily housing market might be impacted by the pandemic.

1. House Foreclosures Could Lead to More Rental Demand

For the immediate future, tenants may be stuck in place, unable to move either due to logistical or economic reasons. Some multifamily buildings are prohibiting new residents, while others only permit remote showings, which can make it harder for prospective tenants to make a decision.

A report from Attom Data Solutions showed nationwide foreclosure lows in February 2020. However, Chief Product Officer Todd Teta predicts a rise in foreclosures once courts lift the ban on foreclosures and evictions. This could lead to more people seeking apartments, which could create a market ripe for landlords.

Much depends on what happens once the country re-opens—and when that phased reopening occurs.

“We want states to open up at a safe pace, but obviously, as the economic situation gets worse, that will impact the opportunities available in the market,” says Brant Brown, COO and CFO of Westmount Realty Capital, a commercial real estate investment and development firm in Dallas. “We’re looking at what the unemployment story is going to be, what collections are going to be, and how quickly the states re-open.”

2. Tighter Lending Restrictions Will Force Investors Not to Over-Leverage

The NMHC report spotlights tighter lending restrictions, showing the Equity Financing Index dropping from 61 to 13, and the Debt Financing Index plummeting from 68 to 20.

According to the report’s statistics, 75% of respondents said that equity financing was less available than in the three months prior; 71% of respondents said debt financing conditions were less favorable.

Especially now, Brown advises investors to avoid over-leveraging property or not leaving enough cash in the bank for repairs and emergency expenses, which could include tenants not paying rent due to job loss.

“A lot of multifamily operators have been running their properties cash-poor. In times like this, it really catches up with them,” Brown says.

In spite of low interest rates, underwriters will be looking to make sure investors have sufficient capital to manage the property.

3. Investors could find opportunities in suburban markets.

The second month of the pandemic in the U.S. found many city-dwellers temporarily fleeing their apartments for more space and a change of scenery.

“The fundamental story of [urban] markets is attractive, so I wouldn’t place bets on what the long term [impact] will be,” Brown says. “In the short run, a lot of people are very concerned about [the spread of the virus], and they’re going to vote with their feet.”

Cities may become less desirable places to live as the risk of infection continues to weigh on communities and remote work has people spending more time at home. Residents may seek larger apartments with more amenities in less populated areas, says Brown. “Wherever they move, it probably won’t be those city centers.”

More Homeowners Sprucing up their Gardens and Curb Appeal in the Time of Coronavirus

One positive thing that appears be to happening in the time of coronavirus sheltering /staying in place orders is that people are engaging in more home hobbies and creative activities that they may have not had time for before due to social activities. One can see a lot of articles about staying creative or why the quarantine can make one more creative.  One activity that Americans apparently have spent more time and money on is gardening, based on retail sales and employment data.  This is a good time for homeowners because gardening, yard improvements, and minor home renovation or simple do-it-yourself projects (deck) improve curbside appeal and reflect the kind of care and maintenance that homeowners put into their homes, both external and internal. Attractive gardens, a clean yard, freshly coated fences, mended pathways will make a home attractive to buyers, in the time of and after the coronavirus social distancing period.

Building materials/gardening store sales and employment are up compared to retail trade

Retail sales data from the U.S. Census Bureau showed that retail sales of building materials, garden equipment, and supply dealer stores (NAICS 444) increased 1% in March from February and was up 7% on a year-over-year basis. In comparison, retail sales and food services fell 9% on a month-over-month basis and 6% on a year-over-year basis.  Other industries that had higher sales in March were grocery stores (+27% m/m and +29% y/y); health and personal care stores (+4% m/m, +4% y/y), and general merchandise stores that includes department stores and other general merchandise stores (6% m/m, 7% y/y).

In 2019, Americans spent nearly $380 billion (retail sales) on building materials, garden equipment, and supplies. Building materials and supply stores (paint and wallpaper stores and hardware stores) sold $334 billion (so $41 billion is garden supplies).

While brick-and-mortar retail stores have shed about 300,000 jobs since January 2017, the employment in brick and mortar stores has remained relatively flat at 1.3 million. In March 2020, it is one of the few sectors that posted year-over-year employment gains, of 11,500 jobs. However, employment did fall by nearly 4,000 from February to March.

Impact of landscaping on home values

What’s the impact of projects that improve a home’s curb appeal on the likelihood of selling a home and home values? According to NAR’s 2018 Remodeling Impact Report: Outdoor Features,  “74% of REALTORS® suggested sellers complete a landscape maintenance program before attempting to sell, and 17 percent said the project most recently sealed a deal for them, resulting in a closed transaction.” The cost in 2018 was $3,000 and 100% was recovered when the home was sold.

Single-family detached homes with green spaces: part of the American dream

Since 2009, the prices of single-family homes have also picked up faster than condominiums, as low mortgage rates have made a home purchase more affordable, as well as due to difficulty obtaining individual-unit mortgage financing in condominium projects that are not FHA-approved.1 As of March 2020, the median sales price of single-detached as $282,500, or nearly $20,000 more than the median sales price of condominiums/coops of $263,400.  Since January 2012, the median sales price of single-family detached homes has increased by 83% compared to 70% for condominiums/coops. The higher price of single-family homes reflects the preference of buyers for these homes, perhaps because the house with the picket fence and green yard embodies the attainment of the American dream of homeownership.

We can help you sell your house or support you finding a new home,

Talk To Tammy: 636-931-9100 or contact us via tammy@talktotammy.com

Most REALTORS® Confident That Home Prices Will Stand Firm

Many real estate professionals don’t foresee a significant drop in home prices from the COVID-19 pandemic, and certainly not to the degree of the Great Recession’s impact on the housing market. For residential property prices over the next 12 months, 38% of more than 4,000 REALTORS® say they expect prices to increase and 23% expect prices to remain stable, according to the March 2020 REALTORS® Confidence Index Survey, a monthly survey of real estate transactions conducted by the National Association of REALTORS®. 

“Although the pandemic continues to be a major disruption in regards to the timing of home sales, home prices have been holding up well,” Lawrence Yun, NAR’s chief economist, said in a statement following a report on pending home sales in March. “In fact, due to the ongoing housing shortage, home prices are likely to squeeze out a gain in 2020 to a new record high.”

Home prices were still rising across the country as the pandemic widened in scope in the U.S. in March. As of March, the median home sales price increased 8% year over year to $282,500, according to NAR.

“Prices have held up due to a combination of measures under the $2.2 trillion CARES Act passed plus the additional $484 billion funding passed April 23 to pay for unemployment insurance benefit claims and payroll assistance for small businesses,” Scholastica Cororaton, a research economist for NAR, notes on the association’s Economists’ Outlook blog.

The median list prices in several markets are still up compared to a year ago, according to realtor.com® data. For example, in Los Angeles, the median list price is up 16% compared to a year ago, while in Las Vegas and Denver, median listing prices are up by 3.6% and 3.5%, respectively, compared to a year ago. In the New York-New Jersey area, which has accounted for the largest share of coronavirus cases in the country, median listing prices are still up from one year ago by 2.9%.

As of April 18, 58 of the 100 largest metros were still seeing higher median listing prices when compared to a year prior, according to realtor.com® data. Properties were staying on the market longer—six more days during the week of April 18 compared to April 2019.

But markets like Washington, D.C., were seeing median list prices up by 4.4% the week of April 18 compared to a year prior.

For more info, Talk To Tammy: 636-931-9100 !

Historic low mortgage rates + Open Houses are back!

In consideration of member demand generated from state and local guidelines being adjusted to allow business to start reopening, MARIS has made the Open House capability available once again – meaning, we get to plan and host Open House events again.

Also, Mortgage rates reached a new record low last week, with the 30-year fixed-rate mortgage falling to its lowest average ever since Freddie Mac began tracking such data in 1971. “The size and depth of the secondary mortgage market is helping to keep rates at record lows,” says Sam Khater, Freddie Mac’s chief economist. “These low rates are driving higher refinance activity and have modestly helped improve purchase demand from their extremely low levels in mid-April. While many people are benefiting from low mortgage rates, it’s important to remember not all people are able to take advantage of them given the current pandemic.”

The Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation “Freddie Mac” reported the following national averages with mortgage rates for the week ending April 30:

  • 30-year fixed-rate mortgages: averaged 3.23%, with an average 0.7 point, falling from last week’s 3.33% average. The previous all-time low for the 30-year mortgage was 3.29%, set during the week ending March 5. A year ago, 30-year rates averaged 4.14%.
  • 15-year fixed-rate mortgage: averaged 2.77%, with an average 0.6 point, falling from a 2.86% average. A year ago, 15-year rates averaged 3.60%.
  • 5-year hybrid adjustable-rate mortgages: averaged 3.14%, with an average 0.4 point, dropping from a 3.28% average. A year ago, 5-year ARMs averaged 3.68%.

Freddie Mac reports average commitment rates, along with average fees and points, to reflect the total upfront cost of obtaining a mortgage.

If you have questions about selling your house or need help finding a new home, talk to Tammy!

Call: 636-931-9100