Archive September 2019

TARGETED STAGING

When selling a home, it can be difficult to find a perfect sweet spot of how to market your property to every single buyer demographic, but you can stage extra bedrooms of your home to appeal to certain types of people. When getting your home ready for viewings, consider these three target groups:

Young couples. Many first-time homebuyers are young people with the idea of starting a family. Consider taking a spare room and converting it into a child’s bedroom. This helps the buyer visualize the possibility of raising kids in the space.

Single professionals. Young professionals today are increasingly working from home. Having an office space in your home with good lighting for long hours spent on the job is a great idea. Think about furnishing the office with a pullout couch, showing the young buyer that while the space is made for working, it can also double as a place to house weekend guests.

Large families. Big families need a lot of space. Converting spare storage rooms or offices into enough bedrooms for a full family is a must. You can even take offices on your main floor or in the basement and show potential buyers that there is plenty of room for not only the children they have now, but also for future family expansions. Also consider mocking up these bedrooms for a wide variety of ages: a room for an infant with a crib; a room for an elementary schooler with toys; and a more refined room for a child in high school or college.

Fall Appeal

While it’s true that most homes tend to sell in spring or summer, this shouldn’t discourage potential sellers from listing a home in fall. Think about these tips and tricks to make your home more appealing to buyers as the leaves start to turn.

Show off the home’s potential. Give buyers an idea of how the home would look during warmer months. If you’re planning on selling later in the calendar year, consider taking photos of your home in the spring or summer and have them on display during open houses or showings. Giving potential buyers a glimpse into the future may get them to sign on the dotted line.

Take care of exterior aesthetics. Piles of leaves or mounds of snow can make the exterior of your property look messy. Colder months tend to make most outdoor areas look dull or dreary, but remember to keep things clean for any photos taken of your home or for any viewings. Consider using markers to clearly define the edges of your property, as weather elements may make things fuzzy to buyers.

Brighten up the place. Colder months can feel dreary. To take advantage of available natural light, keep your blinds and curtains wide open for showings. The more natural light shining into your home, the more attractive it will look. Also, think about using different types of light bulbs to add extra brightness to your living spaces. And don’t forget about outdoor lighting! With the sun setting earlier, a well-lit exterior is a must for viewing your home in the afternoon or evening.

THE bigger PICTURE

While the price of a home might seem to be in your budget at face value, forgotten costs of the buying and moving process could potentially put you over budget in the long run. Here are six costs that are often overlooked, courtesy of Redfin:

Improvements. Even if the home you buy isn’t a fixer-upper, there may be things you want to change or add to make it your own, such as new flooring, paint or counter tops, which can add up to be a large expense.

Moving. Moving costs money, and the price goes up the more stuff you have and the farther you’re moving.

Furnishings. You may want to buy furnishings for your new home, since the furniture and accessories you own now may not be enough or fit in with a new aesthetic.

Maintenance. This is an expense that catches renters especially off guard, because maintenance is usually taken care of by the building owners. You can expect to repair or replace a variety of things during the life of a home, so be sure to include maintenance costs in your budget.

Utilities. While you may already be paying for utilities at your current residence, the costs could be higher in your new home depending on the size and area. There are also some utilities that are included in rent that homeowners have to pay for, like garbage collection.

Time. You will meet with several people to sign documents, set up utilities and prepare your move—time you might take off from work. This is fine if you’re able to use vacation days, but if not, you may need to take unpaid leave.